The rain came

It rained for the first time at home on 17 May 2010 and more on subsequent days, with over 2 inches of rainfall at the Kabaraye weather station on 18th, although the monsoon has not arrived yet at the time, but it has reached the Andaman sea and the southern Indian Ocean on 20th and already reached lower Myanmar on 24th May.

There had been no rain until that day, and when it rained, it was not just a sprinkle / let hsay yay , but definitely wetting the ground and I remembered the verse I was taught in my fresher year and also in the “My Fair Lady” movie / “Pygmylion” play: “The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain”

This year is an exceptional year. During April, there was news of drought in Yunnan and other SE Asian countries with discussion about low water level in the Mekong river at a forum, but apart from the fact that there has been no showers at Thingyan, it was not unusual, except that temperatures at Mann / Minbu reached a record 46 C. There was also no rain at the Full moon day of Kasone, but as the Burmese calendar is advanced this year, with Thingyan falling in Kasone instead of the usual Tagu, and the Full moon day of Kasone falling on 27-April instead of May as usual, I did not take it as unusual.

At the end of April, there was warning about storms, especially when the 2nd anniversary of Nargis neared, but temperatures across Myanmar soared and broke the May highest temperature records in many towns Myinnmu, Naypyitaw Pyinmana, Magway, Minbu, Chauk and Monywa and repeatedly in some, with Myinnmu reaching over 47 C. Although there was rain in northern and southern Myanmar, there were none in Yangon until the 17th, and no news about any storm in Myanmar yet, apart from some local thunderstorms. This Yangon rain brings relief as the scorching sun and the heat was terrible.

The sun was very intense even at 8 am, and one has to use umbrella whenever one goes out during the daytime, and it was still hot outside at 6 pm. I remember another Burmese saying: HpaNut Nae. Htee MaPar, Nyway AhKhar Hma. Thi.

And this led me to the next verse: DarNa. Nae. ThiLa. MaPar, Thay Khar Hma. Thi.

The words I remembered might not be the actual ones of the original, but you will understand what I mean: we need to practice DarNa.  / ဒါန / charity and ThiLa / သီလ / integrity while we can and make sure we have the right state of mind at the time of our BaWa HsiHsar / deathbed.

However, DarNa.  / ဒါန / charity and ThiLa / သီလ / integrity alone is insufficient as we also need BaWaNar / ဘဝနာtoo

Nowadays, life is much cooler as the rain has continued thanks to “Laila” a tropical storm which passed  Andhra coast, India on 23rd May and monsoon has now reached lower Myanmar, but the TRUTH about DarNa.  / ဒါန / charity, ThiLa / သီလ / integrity and BaWaNar / ဘဝနာ still holds true as it is a universal truth.

ps

The Rain in Spain

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“The Rain in Spain” is a song from the musical My Fair Lady, with music by Frederick Loewe and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner. The song was published in 1956.

The song is a key turning point in the plotline of the musical. Professor Higgins and Colonel Pickering have been drilling Eliza Doolittle incessantly with speech exercises, trying to break her Cockney accent speech pattern. The key lyric in the song is “The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain”, which contains five words that a Cockney would pronounce with an [aɪ] – more like “eye” than the Received Pronunciation diphthong [eɪ]. With the three of them nearly exhausted, Eliza finally “gets it”, and recites the sentence with all long-a’s. The trio breaks into song, repeating this key phrase as well as singing other exercises correctly, such as “In Hertford, Hereford and Hampshire, hurricanes hardly ever happen”, and “How Kind of you to let me come”, in which Eliza had failed before by dropping the leading ‘H’. In Spanish, the phrase is given as “La lluvia en España” and it was translated as “La lluvia en Sevilla es una maravilla” (Rain in Sevilla is marvelous).

According to The Disciple and His Devil, the biography of Gabriel Pascal by his wife Valerie, it was Gabriel Pascal who introduced the famous phonetic exercises “The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain” and “In Hertford, Hereford, and Hampshire, hurricanes hardly ever happen” into Pygmalion in 1938, the first of which wound up leading to the song in My Fair Lady.[1]

Spanish rain does not actually stay mainly in the plain. It falls mainly in the northern mountains. [2]

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2 Responses to “The rain came”

  1. SHKyaw Says:

    Thanks Ko Nyi Win.
    I think My Fair Lady song reads…….
    “The rain in Spain drains mainly on the plains”

    And we have to thank “Laila” a tropical storm which passes Andhra coast, India on 23rd May.
    Rgds,
    shk

  2. nyiwin Says:

    thanks to my friend ko SHK, I have revised and updated my blog after searching for “The Rain in Spain” and got this from Wikipedia:

    “The Rain in Spain” is a song from the musical My Fair Lady, with music by Frederick Loewe and lyrics by Alan Jay Lerner. The song was published in 1956.
    The song is a key turning point in the plotline of the musical. Professor Higgins and Colonel Pickering have been drilling Eliza Doolittle incessantly with speech exercises, trying to break her Cockney accent speech pattern. The key lyric in the song is “The rain in Spain stays mainly in the plain”, which contains five words that a Cockney would pronounce with an [aɪ] – more like “eye” than the Received Pronunciation diphthong [eɪ].

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