Hinthar / Be-Hintha / Brahminy duck / Ruddy Shelduck

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hinthar / ruddy shelduck

 

Hinthar / Be-Hintha / Brahminy duck / Ruddy Shelduck

I found a post of Phoenix duck photo in FB by Aung Win, marked by a friend and thought how it looked like a Hinthar. Of course the colour is different, but ducks are ducks and they look alike as both are not white. I had heard about Hinthars since young from the tales, myths and seen them in pictures, utensils and in pagodas. Hinthars are part of our cultural heritage. We have tri-pidaka on hinthar, Thura ThaThi on hinthar, hinthar weights, hinthar toys, hinthar Yun / laquerware, etc. Later I saw them live in the Yangoon Zoological Gardens in the large bird cage.

Bago has a double hinthar as its emblem. It originated from the local myth that a long time ago, the area was water with only a small rock above the sea. A hinthar couple became tired when it reached this area and as there was only place for one bird to perch on, the male got down first and the female got on its back and rested. That is why, it is said, the wives get the upper hand in Bago.

There is also a story of how 90,000 hinthars entrapped in a cave got destroyed after they ate each other but I do not remember the exact plot. It is from the Buddhawin maybe one of the 550 jakatas.

Seeing the Phoenix duck led me to search for it on the net and I was dismayed not to find any duck on the first page. There were only I searched for hinthar and this led me to Brahmani duck which looks a little different but as it was flying, I thought it was a hinthar. But after reading Prof. Maung Maung Nyo’s comments “Hintha or Brahmani ducks as you called” I searched for hinthar again and got to “Brahminy duck” / Ruddy Shelduck which is the correct hinthar I have seen on the Ayeyarwaddy sand banks (Banks of clean sand are what the brahminy duck requires) while I was working with the Road to Mandalay back in 1997. I had seen them on sand banks between Mandalay and Nyaung Oo, far from human habitation. They are also seen around Minbu – Mann oil field Ayeyarwaddy shore but I have not observed them as I rarely get to the shore.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruddy_Shelduck

The Ruddy Shelduck, Tadorna ferruginea, is a member of the duck, goose and swan family Anatidae. It is in the shelduck subfamily Tadorninae. In India it is known as the Brahminy Duck.

There are very small resident populations of this species in north west Africa and Ethiopia, but the main breeding area of this species is from south east Europe across central Asia to southeast China. These birds are mostly migratory, wintering in southern Asia.

it has not been observed on the coastal mudflats, but along the Ayeyarwady it is probably the commonest duck in winter, and although it may arrive in flocks and break up into pairs as soon as the winter partners have been chosen, several pairs may collect together, but it is very unusual to see more than twenty five or thirty birds in any one gathering.

In winter it is the commonest duck on the Ayeyarwady and Chindwin rivers and on the larger rivers of southern Myanmar and Rakhine. It is occasionally seen on inland lakes and jheels and pairs or small flocks regularly visit the Sittwe and Ponnagyun mudflats in October or early November and are of the last to depart, staying till early in April.

In Tibet and Mongolia, Ruddy Shelduck is considered sacred by the Buddhists. It is also a sacred animal in Slavic mythology.[citation needed]

In Hindi and Urdu (India/Pakistan) it is called Surkhab.

Phoenix Ducks

Nyi Win they look like Brahmani duck / Hinthar

Nyi Win the colour and pattern is different
but of course, ducks are ducks
I have not seen Brahmani duck / Hinthar for 13 years although they are said to be present on the Ayeyarwaddy banks around Minbu – Mann oil field

Maung Nyo There are Hintha or Brahmani ducks as you called on the sand banks of Irrawaddy, Chindwin and Pegu rivers. I recently saw their photographs and described as such by a foreigner photographer.

Nyi Win

thanks for the information Sayargyi
I first saw the Brahmani duck / Hinthar on the sand banks of the Ayeyarwaddy between Mandalay and Nyaung Oo when I worked for the Road to Mandalay and heard that they are also present around Minbu
the hinthar and nagarr murals and sculptures of Bagan era (the Nagayone temple, SulaMaNi temple, Phayarr Thone Hsu, etc.) in the Bagan temples look lifelike, real ducks and snakes, not the current day ones which look like myths

Nyi Win

when I searched for “hinthar” yesterday, I got Brahmani duck, which looks a little different from the ones I saw on the Ayeyarwaddy and the Yangon Zoo
today, it led me to “Brahminy duck” / Ruddy Shelduck which is the correct Hinthar on the …Ayeyarwaddy
please visit
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruddy_Shelduck

Maung Nyo Dear Dr NW, TQ. I think they use Sheldrake and Shelduck for Hintha male and female.

Nyi Win it can also be seen in the Yangon Zoological Gardens at Kandawgyi

Maung Nyo Dear NW,TQ. The Hinthas are associated with Mon people. They called Pegu (Bago) as Hanthawaddy and a picture of Sheldrake bearing a shelduck is the national emblem of Mon. Gautama Buddha told the story of elimination of th whole tribe of 90,000 ducks by eating each other(Cannibalism). Henzada was named after a sheldrake(?).

Nyi Win thank you Sayargyi
I could not remember the source of the “hinthar koethaung pyet see chinn” in the cave

Harry Hpone Thant You will see a lot of Ruddy Shelduck on the sandbars of the Ayeyaewady and Chindwin from January to the beginning of the monsoon when the Ayeyarwady rises.

also see

http://www.myanmar.gov.mm/Perspective/persp1998/2-98/duc2-98.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruddy_Shelduck

http://www.birding.in/birds/Anseriformes/Anatidae/ruddy_shelduck.htm

BRAHMINY DUCK
(BE-HINTHA) OF MYANMAR

http://www.myanmar.gov.mm/Perspective/persp1998/2-98/duc2-98.htm

  • Local Name: Myanmar. Be-Hintha
  • General Features

Length 25 inches. Black primaries and a white patch on the wing, nearly concealed at rest, are conspicuous in flight. The female has no black collar. Young birds are like the female, but duller, and have black vermiculated with brown and pale rufors and the tail narrowly barred and tipped with rufors.

  • Voice

A loud melodious ‘ah-onk’, with variants, is uttered freely. The voices of the male and female are said to be distinguishable, the former having more of an “o” sound, the latter an “a” sound.

  • Habits and Habitats

Banks of clean sand are what the brahminy duck requires, resembling in this respect the bar-headed goose. It is not typically a bird of the jheels, though it may be met with occasionally, and it has not been observed on the coastal mudflats, but along the Ayeyarwady it is probably the commonest duck in winter, and although it may arrive in flocks and break up into pairs as soon as the winter partners have been chosen, several pairs may collect together, but it is very unusual to see more than twenty five or thirty birds in any one gathering.

  • Status and distribution

A southern palaearctic species. In winter it is the commonest duck on the Ayeyarwady and Chindwin rivers and on the larger rivers of southern Myanmar and Rakhine. It is occasionally seen on inland lakes and jheels and pairs or small flocks regularly visit the Sittwe and Ponnagyun mudflats in October or early November and are of the last to depart, staying till early in April.

Aung Moe Hein (F.D)

Ruddy Shelduck

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruddy_Shelduck

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Ruddy Shelduck
Conservation status
Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Anseriformes
Family: Anatidae
Genus: Tadorna
Species: T. ferruginea
Binomial name
Tadorna ferruginea
(Pallas, 1764)
Synonyms
Casarca ferruginea
Anas ferruginea
Casarca rutila

The Ruddy Shelduck, Tadorna ferruginea, is a member of the duck, goose and swan family Anatidae. It is in the shelduck subfamily Tadorninae. In India it is known as the Brahminy Duck.

There are very small resident populations of this species in north west Africa and Ethiopia, but the main breeding area of this species is from south east Europe across central Asia to southeast China. These birds are mostly migratory, wintering in southern Asia.

Male & Female at Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, Rajasthan, India.

Although becoming quite rare in southeast Europe and southern Spain, the Ruddy Shelduck is still common across much of its Asian range. It may be this population which gives rise to vagrants as far west as Iceland, Great Britain and Ireland. However, since the European population is declining, it is likely that most occurrences in western Europe in recent decades are escapes or feral birds. Although this bird is observed in the wild from time to time in eastern North America, no evidence of a genuine vagrant has been found.

This is a bird of open country, and it will breed on cliffs,[1] in burrows, tree holes or crevices distant from water, laying 6-16 creamy-white eggs, incubated for 30 days. The Ruddy Shelduck is usually found in pairs or small groups and rarely forms large flocks. However, moulting and wintering gatherings on chosen lakes or slow rivers can be very large.

Ruddy Shelduck Tadorna ferruginea at Slimbridge Wildfowl and Wetlands Centre, Gloucestershire, England.

The Ruddy Shelduck is a distinctive species, 58–70 cm long with a 110–135 cm wingspan. It has orange-brown body plumage and a paler head. The wings are white with black flight feathers. It swims well, and in flight looks heavy, more like a goose than a duck. The sexes of this striking species are similar, but the male has a black ring at the bottom of the neck in the breeding season summer, and the female often has a white face patch. The call are is a loud wild honking.

In captivity this species is generally aggressive and antisocial and is best housed in pairs unless in a very large area. Then it may mix with other species, although it will still be feisty at breeding time.

The genus name Tadorna comes from Celtic roots and means “pied waterfowl”, essentially the same as the English “shelduck”.[2]

In Tibet and Mongolia, Ruddy Shelduck is considered sacred by the Buddhists. It is also a sacred animal in Slavic mythology.[citation needed]

In Hindi and Urdu (India/Pakistan) it is called Surkhab.

The Ruddy Shelduck is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies.

[edit] References

  1. ^ Stockley C H (1923) Some notes on Indian game birds. J. Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. 29:278-279
  2. ^ Kear, Janet (2005). Ducks, Geese, and Swans. Oxford University Press. pp. 420. ISBN 0 19 861008 4. http://books.google.com/books?id=MfrdBcKd79wC&pg=RA1-PA439&lpg=RA1-PA439&dq=crested+shelduck&source=web&ots=RS734hgSmI&sig=006C0Hb6hpDK1aAEwu-ivfssJBk#PRA1-PA441,M1.

[edit] Gallery

 

Female at Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, Rajasthan, India.

 

Female at Keoladeo National Park, Bharatpur, Rajasthan, India.

Ruddy Shelduck 

http://www.birding.in/birds/Anseriformes/Anatidae/ruddy_shelduck.htm

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Kingdom: Animalia     Phylum: Chordata     Class: Aves (Birds)     Order: Anseriformes Family: Anatidae

Ruddy Shelduck – photograph © Rajiv Lather

Ruddy Shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea), also called Brahminy Duck, is a common winter visitor in India. This bird is found in large wetlands, rivers with mud flats and shingle banks. Found in large congregation on lakes and reservoirs. It breeds in high altitude lakes and swamps in Jammu & Kashmir. Arrives in north India by October and departs by April.

Size: 66 cm

Identification: Orange brown duck with a buff colored head. The male develops a black collar in breeding season. Black primaries.

Local name: Surkhab, Chakwa (male), Chakwi (female)

Food: grain, vegetable shoots, tubers, aquatic insects, molluscs, reptiles

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One Response to “Hinthar / Be-Hintha / Brahminy duck / Ruddy Shelduck”

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