India through the eyes of a Myanmar visitor: rural India

road near Sankassa village

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My friend Moe Win who was a nautical engineer told me that whenever his ship reached India, he was very happy as it is the best port visit for him, as his ship does not get to Yangon. Indians are part of Myanmar life and as Indians (of India) can speak English, there is no problem as with other countries where English is not well understood. He also likes Indian food and therefore he was at home in Indian ports.

I also like Indian food as my father liked it and we had it frequently at Indian shops or bought and had it at home.

Rural India sight is not a surprise to me, as I have seen many Indians in Yangon and in villages at Zeyawaddy, Nyaunglebin, Kyaikhto and in the Sittwe, Kyauktaw and Mrauk U townships.

Brick dwellings are the norm in India. Even in the smallest villages, brick buildings, however small, are seen, even if roofs are of thatch. There seems to be scarcity of wood and bamboo.

Cow dung is dried on walls and is for use as cooking fuel. It is dried on wall so as not to take space on the ground.

Palm trees are present in rural areas everywhere.

Buffalos are also seen everywhere in the countryside and cows too!

Railways level crossing looks different from Myanmar.

Brick kilns are everywhere as all buildings are of brick. However, they have high smoke funnels as different from Myanmar kilns where there is no funnel.

Date trees are also seen. Dried maize / corn is also a common sight.

Sugarcane is also grown everywhere.

Groups of unknown small stupa like structures are also seen. As Hindus cremate, I wonder whether these structures are places where ash of the deceased is stored. They might be burial ash storage sites.

Teak plantation and a forest or plantation were also observed beside the highway.

We stopped for health as in Myanmar highways! There are no public foodcourts, toilets and restroom stopover sites on the highway. There are private food shops which also provide latrines. We once used the latrine of a fuel shop were the bus refilled.

The village near Sankassa / ThinKaThaTa NaGoh is unique as there are plenty of birds that are not afraid of humans. They come nearby and are seen even in the village. There were peacocks and peahen on trees, in farmland and inside the village at Sankassa. The local people do not harm the birds and they in turn are not afraid. I wonder whether it might be due to the previous presence of Buddha and all previous Buddhas who returned to earth from TharWaTeinThar at the same hill, the Sankassa / ThinKaThaTa NaGoh.

Potato farms are also seen frequently as it is their staple food.

The crows at Sankassa are light headed as those near the Nepal border.

Indian hoe has a special unique design: it is double layer,

Water supply for irrigation comes from underground pipes. They are pumped into ditches or brick tanks and then flowed in ditches.

Dahl / ပဲ were seen placed upright leaning on walls and let dry, similar to the way sesame is collected in Myanmar.

Squirrels are also seen at Sankassa.

I met boys playing cricket, the Indian National game, near Sankassa.

Some houses seem to be built by the government or company as they are identical.

But occasionally rare non brick huts were seen.

The roads in India are good except at some places where repairs have not been made, as seen by the road in remote Sankassa which is very good.

peacock at Sankassa

The village near Sankassa / ThinKaThaTa NaGoh is unique as there are plenty of birds that are not afraid of humans. They come nearby and are seen even in the village. There were peacocks and peahen on trees, in farmland and inside the village at Sankassa. The local people do not harm the birds and they in turn are not afraid. I wonder whether it might be due to the previous presence of Buddha and all previous Buddhas who returned to earth from TharWaTeinThar at the same hill, the Sankassa / ThinKaThaTa NaGoh.

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One Response to “India through the eyes of a Myanmar visitor: rural India”

  1. nyiwin Says:

    thanks Dr. Ko Ko Gyi

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