shin-pyu narr-tha mingalar ah-hlu ရွင္ျပဳ နားသ မဂၤလာ အလွဴ / noviciating and ear piercing ceremony

Recently, I went to the shin-pyu narr-tha mingalar ah-hlu / noviciating and ear piercing ceremony by U Myint Shwe and Daw Mya Nyunt, parents of an engineer working with me here at Mann oil field near Minbu. They live in a village nearby and the shin-pyu narr-tha mingalar ah-hlu is for their grandchildren_ noviciating ceremony of 5 boys and ear piercing ceremony of 6 girls.

Minbu area is part of the Ahnyar in the Dry belt, on the west bank of the Ayeyarwaddy, in the central part of Myanmar where Myanmar culture is not easily changed by other influences.

It is a Myanmar tradition for parents to have their sons enter monkhood at least twice in their lives, the first time as a novice before they attain adulthood, and then soon after becoming an adult. In this way, a son is said to repay his mother’s milk debt incurred during infancy by permitting the parents make a good deed for their merit. Many enter monkhood several times later throughout their lives but that is for their own merit.

Frequently all sons enter monkhood at the same time, and sometimes even the father. The daughters also have ear piercing ceremony at the same time, hence, a combined Shin-pyu Ya-han Khan Narr-tha mingalar ah-hlu / noviciating, monkhood and ear piercing ceremony.

There are also group noviciating ceremonies, group monkhood ceremonies and group noviciating and monkhood ceremonies held by relatives or by a group of people.

In such good deeds, lunch is offered to monks and all who attended_ guests near and far and even the whole village.

ႊA would be novice monk in princely dress in front of the Win Theingi Myanmar traditional orchestra at the noviciating and ear piercing ceremony ceremony

ႊA would be novice monk in princely dress in front of the Win Theingi Myanmar traditional orchestra at the noviciating and ear piercing ceremony ceremony

When I got to the ceremony mandat / canopy, I was surprised to find a Myanmar traditional orchestra / Saing Waing  playing. It is rare nowadays to find such a Saing Waing at ceremonies and even so in villages as they cost a lot. This Win Theingi Myanmar Saing from Magway costs 500,000 Kyats for the two day ceremony.

We were given chairs and we listened to the Win Theingi Myanmar Saing while watching the proceedings. The ear piercing ceremony has been finished earlier and it was the time for meals. The monks were offered Hsoon / monk meal and were still unfinished. Guests too were entertained with mid-day meal / lunch in several places as they come. It is the custom to spread out the meals in several different places as there is not much space for all guests at a single place. There is a main reception area but some guests are entertained in the houses of neighbours as it is too crowded and busy in their house.

U Myint Ngwe and Daw Mya Nyunt who held the noviciating and ear piercing ceremony

U Myint Ngwe and Daw Mya Nyunt who held the noviciating and ear piercing ceremony

 

While we listened to the Saing music U Myint Shwe and Daw Mya Nyunt came and sat near us for a while and then they went off to entertain others but U Myint Shwe come back near us again and again as we were his special guests.

The family was splendidly dressed. The boys and girls who would enter novice and had undergone ear piercing were in traditional royal dresses. The occasion is a very important one in the life of a Myanmar and no expenses were spared and everything was done as much as one could afford.

After some time, we were taken to the house of a neighbor and fed upstairs in the main room. A Myanmar traditional village house is a stilted one and the ground level is open.

There was chicken and fried fish curry, fried dried prawn (I think mixed with dried fish), pe-pin pauk chin and pae-hinn yae (the type used with ah-nyar mohingha) and for dessert, grapes, oranges, kyauk-kyaw, cake and la-phet.

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